Europe Could Pass Green Energy Target

Figures from the national governments suggest that the EU is on track to surpass its goal of generating 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020 The European Union is to surpass its target of 20 percent consumption of energy from renewable sources by 2020, according to national forecasts submitted to the European Commission. The

Figures from the national governments suggest that the EU is on track to surpass its goal of generating 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020

The European Union is to
surpass its target of 20 percent consumption of energy from renewable sources
by 2020, according to national forecasts submitted to the European Commission.

The EU executive found
that overall, the bloc will achieve a 20.3 percent share of renewables in its
energy mix.

According to a summary
published on Thursday, 10 out of the EU’s 27 member states are on track to
exceed their national targets for renewable energy, with a further 12 set to
meet their goals using domestic sources of renewable energy.

However, five member
states, Belgium, Denmark, Italy,
Luxembourg and Malta, will
have to source their renewable energy from outside their countries.

Europe‘s renewable energy directive sets
an overall EU target of 20 percent and individual binding national targets. The
bloc defines biofuels, biomass, wind, solar energy as well as hydro power as
being renewable.

In 2007, the most recent
year for which there is data available, the renewable share was nine percent,
with approximately 63 percent of this coming from biomass and biowaste.

Energy commissioner
Gunther Oettinger used the occasion of the release of the figures to challenge
member states to go yet further.

“Our task will be to
help all member states not only to reach the 20 percent target but to go
beyond.”

“However, Italy seems to rely on lots of imports, so they
are failing to realize the development of renewable energy at home,” she
said, adding: “There may also be some problems coming from the countries
where Italy
is looking for imports. Some of these involve hydro projects with questionable
environmental impacts.”

Additionally, Slovakia
appears to be focusing mostly on the heating sector, she said, “a move
that definitely needs to happen, but it will be a lost opportunity if they do
not take a look at the electricity sector.”

Renewable Energy Projects in Bosnia and Herzegovina

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