Iceland is using ‘Thor’s hammer’ to harness the power of MAGMA: Drilling rig begins work on 3 mile hole to harvest geothermal energy

Iceland is using ‘Thor’s hammer’  to harness the power of MAGMA: Drilling rig begins work on 3 mile hole to harvest geothermal energy

Iceland relies on geothermal for 65 percent of its energy and one group is using 'Thor' to harvest more of this power source. Iceland is using 'Thor' (pictured) to harvest geothermal energy. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project's rig is drilling three miles into old lava flows in Reykjanes with the hopes of producing the hottest hole in the world with temperatures anywhere between 752 and 1832 °F

In 2009, the team accidentally discovered a magma reservoir after drilling 1.25 miles below the surface, which resulted in the most powerful geothermal well on record.

Now, IDDP is back at it, but this time they plan to produce results on a larger scale.

Regular geothermal systems are a well-established technology in which holes are drilled into a hot region beneath the Earth’s surface.

Rocks underground heat water to produce steam. Steam comes up, is purified and used to drive turbines, which drive electric generators.

There may be natural ‘groundwater’ in the hot rocks, or the plant operators may need to drill more holes and pump water down into them.

‘People have drilled into hard rock at this depth, but never before into a fluid system like this,’ Albert Albertsson, assistant director of HS Orka, an Icelandic geothermal-energy company involved in the project, told New Scientist.

Renewable Energy Projects in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply