Passive House

Passive House

Almost 90% of energy consumed comes from fossil, non-renewable resources such as oil, natural gas, uranium and coal. The increasing pollution and the fact that the sources of energy used today are limited, imposes the need to find ways of saving energy and using renewable energy. In Europe, more than 40% of generated energy is

Almost 90% of energy consumed comes from fossil, non-renewable resources such as oil, natural gas, uranium and coal.

The increasing pollution and the fact that the sources of energy used today are limited, imposes the need to find ways of saving energy and using renewable energy. In Europe, more than 40% of generated energy is consumed by buildings. Furthermore, one of the ways with who we can achieve significant energy savings is the standard in building structures, called passive houses.

The term passive house means a building that was constructed in such a way that the annual heat demand of the object can be at a maximum of 15 kWh / (m² a) the joint consumption of primary energy may amount to max.120 kWh / (m² a).

Construction of the facility must be carried out without thermal bridges (ψ <= 0.01 kWh / (m² a)).

The name itself, passive house, comes from the fact that the object should not need an active heating system. Passive house standards are achieved through the application of standard materials of certain characteristics who are built on the objects  under certain rules, and proper Orientation of the objects already in the project.

Some of the main characteristics of the material to be embedded must meet the following parameters:

-          Insulation: heat transfer coefficient must be less than 0.15 W / m² K

-          Construction without thermal bridges ψ <= 0.01 W / m² K

-          Glazing of the building – Uw <0.8 W / m² K

-          Window frames – Uf <0.8 W / m² K

Passive house as a concept first appears in 1991 when it was developed by Dr. Wolfgang Feist, who made the first prototype of the object by the standard passive house in Darmstadt (Germany). Results achieved by the first object contributed to the appearance of objects on the market made by the passive house standard.

In 2006, Franfurkt am Main decided that all the construction financed from the city budget must be built by passive house standard. Starting from the schools, kindergardens, housing, and even social housing. City chose this system because it is the future of sustainable development.

According to some estimates, 20,000 objects throughout the world have been built up to now that meet passive house standards.

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