Sixty-three years of global warming in 15 seconds

In 2013, NASA published a report on global surface temperatures. The study shows that the average global temperatures are rising over a long-term period of monitoring, and that they are unaffected by weather extremes. In 15 seconds, the accompanying video impressively shows how temperatures have developed between 1950 and 2013. In 2013, the average global

In 2013, NASA published a report on global surface temperatures.

The study shows that the
average global temperatures are rising over a long-term period of monitoring,
and that they are unaffected by weather extremes. In 15 seconds, the
accompanying video impressively shows how temperatures have developed between
1950 and 2013.

In 2013, the average global
temperature was 14.6 °C, which is 0.6 °C higher than the average in the 1950s.
The average temperature has even increased by 0.8 °C since 1880. According to
NASA scientists, the past year is on par with the years 2006 and 2009 and
therefore takes 7th place of the warmest years since measurements began. With
the exception of 1998, the 10 warmest years since 1880 all occurred after the
turn of the millennium.

Gavin Schmidt, a
climatologist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies stresses: “A
year or a season can be affected by random weather events. However, this
analysis shows the importance of continuous long-term monitoring.” In view
of the persistently high man-made CO2 emissions, scientists expect
each decade to be warmer than previous ones.

In 1880, when the GISS began
recording temperatures, the CO2 level in the atmosphere was at
approximately 285 ppm. In 1960, the value measured by the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii was already
at 315 ppm, and it reached the highest level yet in 2013 at approximately 400
ppm.

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