What is graphene good for?

It’s hard to imagine a substance only one atom thin: so thin, in fact, that it exists in only two dimensions not three. That’s graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms touted as a miracle material: the strongest substance yet discovered, the fastest conductor of electricity, the most optically pure material, and yet lightweight and flexible enough to

It’s hard to imagine a substance only one atom thin: so thin, in fact, that it exists in only two dimensions not three.

That’s graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms touted as a miracle material: the strongest substance yet discovered, the fastest conductor of electricity, the most optically pure material, and yet lightweight and flexible enough to be made into a bendable LCD ‘smart window’ (which flips from transparent to opaque) like the one pictured here.

There are innumerable potential applications for the material first isolated at the University of Manchester in 2004 (earning a Nobel Prize in 2010) and which has recently received a €1bn research boost from the EU in the form of the Graphene Flagship Initiative. Companies like Samsung, Nokia and IBM, along with national governments, are pouring money into research to turn graphene into the new plastics of the twenty first century. This photo gallery shows some ways in which that could happen. (Source: University of Cambridge)

Graphene  potential impact on renewable energy

A model in Buenos Aires wears a jacket with an integrated solar module that can be used to charge cell phones, iPods, digital cameras and rechargeable batteries. Using graphene to make solar cells out of carbon instead of more costly materials could lower the costs of solar power and simplify the manufacturing process, making clean energy more affordable. 

Renewable Energy Projects in Bosnia and Herzegovina

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